Your cart is currently empty

View Cart

Your wishlist is currently empty

View Wishlist

Yali Story

This is the story of a community of Stone-Age people living in the mountain jungles of Papua, (formerly called Irian Jaya). Until the 1960s, this unique culture existed without any idea of a world beyond their own isolated villages. The Yali were cannibals, warriors, and lived in fear of evil spirits. Four decades ago, westerners entered their primitive world. The foreign missionaries learned the Yali language and culture, taught the Yali to read and write, and translated with them the most published book in the world – the Bible.

  • Item 4850D
  • Region: All
  • Media Type: DVD
  • Running Time: 1 hr 17 min

Alternate formats: Digital Video - $9.99

Retail: $19.99
Price: $9.99
Add to Wishlist

Description

This is the story of a community of Stone-Age people living in the mountain jungles of Papua, (formerly called Irian Jaya). Until the 1960s, this unique culture existed without any idea of a world beyond their own isolated villages. The Yali were cannibals, warriors, and lived in fear of evil spirits. Just four decades ago, westerners entered their primitive world.

The foreign missionaries learned the Yali language and culture, taught the Yali to read and write, and translated with them the most published book in the world – the Bible. The Yali no longer live in fear, but live with faith, hope and love. The Yali live simple lives - without electricity, without running water, with very few possessions. Some would consider them primitive, but there is an intelligence, a simplicity, a dignity to their lives that is amazingly rare and beautiful.

A unique culture living centuries apart from the western world, this story documents the transformation from Stone-Age cannibals to scholars translating the Bible. God transformed their hearts – their churches are packed, they are no longer cannibals or warriors, they are Bible teachers and evangelists.

Won Bronze Remi Award at 2004 Worldfest-Houston. Fullscreen.

Segments Included:
Documentary in three lengths: 28, 15 or 5 minutes
"Lessons from The Yali Story", mission discussion, 40 minutes
Commentary, 28 minutes
John Wilson's cancer story, 16 minutes
Music Video, 3 minutes

DVD Special Features:
- 28-minute documentary available in English, Spanish, Cantonese, Arabic, Mandarin, and Indonesian languages with chapter titles
- Bonus material: "Lessons from The Yali Story," commentary, John Wilson's cancer story, music video and additional resources.

Editorial Reviews

The Yali Story is a video comprised of four sections. The documentary section is twenty-seven minutes long, a discussion lessons learned by the missionaries is forty minutes, the trailer is five minutes, and the music is three minutes. The overall objective is to inform and educate the field of missions by an example of a successful missionary effort in the wilds of Irian Jaya. The documentary section's objective seems to be introductory, historical, and informative while laying down the foundation for the discussion session. The documentary section is captivating with inspiring scenes of the wild, rugged, and magnificent mountains of Irian Jaya along with many photographs of the Yali living their everyday lives. Interviews with principle missionaries involved in bringing the message of Jesus Christ tell the story of the Yali conversion. A positive aspect of the documentary is interviews with Yali leaders involved in Bible translation, literacy teaching, preaching, and spreading the gospel to men, women, and children. It is made clear that the Yali themselves, not just the missionaries, were primary instruments in God's plan. One Yali spokesman relates that they had access to a Bible in Indonesian, but they did not understand Indonesian sufficiently to grasp the meanings. He said, “Now that it is written in our language, I can understand it.” This statement summed up the crux of the message of the video - for people to truly understand the Bible, it must be presented to them in their language. Once the Bible is in the local language it is accessible to all who can read - not just the elite who are educated in some foreign language where the Bible is already available. Bible translation became the genesis for reaching these people for Christ. Some very important points are made for those interested in missions, especially long-term missions. The video emphasizes the need for a long-term missionary commitment by stressing the importance of understanding the culture, becoming fluent in the language, building friendships with nationals, recognizing and helping to develop local leaders, keeping an eye on long-term goals, etc… I would highly recommend it for those interested in making a long-term commitment to spreading the gospel her and abroad. The video could be an excellent case study for seminaries, Bible schools, and other missions classes.

A moving and insightful program about the impact of missionaries and their work to produce a Bible in the language of the Yali people of Papua, a Stone-Age community. This documentary relates how, in the past 40 years, missionaries learned their language, gained their trust, taught them to read and write, converted many of them from cannibals and warriors to Christians, and worked for years with a small group to accomplish the Bible translation. Along the way, one missionary was killed by hostile members of another tribe, but despite the danger, the missionaries persisted. The film presents the story of their dedication as well as commentary by tribal members about how the work of the missionaries has impacted their lives by bringing them literacy and their newly found faith. The criticism that is sometimes leveled against the missionaries for changing the lives of remote tribes is answered with spirit by one of the Yali interviewed, who believes that their lives have changed for the better. Well produced and well edited, this program powerfully conveys the impact of this work on both the missionaries and the people with whom they work. The 27-minute mission discussion, "lessons from the Yali Story." A good choice for social science classes and public libraries.

Until the 1960’s, the Yali tribe of Papua (formerly known as Irian Jaya) existed much as they had for thousands of years. An adventure web site says the following of the tribe. “Yali tools have not changed in a thousand of years [sic] - stone axe of pointed shards wrapped tightly onto a wooden stick, net carrying bags supported from the forehead, thick bows five or six feet long, and arrowhead carved to a purpose -broad and flat for large game, a triple barb for birds, notched and tapered black for setting tribal disputes.” They truly were a Stone-Age people who had existed in isolation from the industrialized world. They had very little knowledge of anything beyond their own villages. They were warriors, cannibals and lived in constant fear of evil spirits. Revenge was an admirable trait in their culture which, not surprisingly, knew little peace.

But in the 1960’s a group of missionaries entered their world and brought with them the gospel of Jesus Christ. Once language barriers had been crossed, the Good News was received with enthusiasm and a type of revival swept the tribe. Men who had once been medicine men became teachers of the Word of God. People who had once lived in fear of evil spirits now placed their trust in the Creator. The people, men and women alike, were educated and taught to read and write.

This DVD presentation, which is roughly a half hour in length (and is available in several languages) features three of the missionaries who were involved in evangelizing the tribe, Bruno de Leeuw and both of John and Gloria Wilson. The video documents the amazing transformation of this people as God changed their lives through the Scriptures. It tells of the long but rewarding process of translating the Scriptures into the native language.

The most amazing moment captured in this presentation, and one of the most powerful things I have witnessed, was the joy of the people as they received the first translations of the Bible into their own language. The New Testament was completed in the ’90s and the entire Bible in the year 2000. To watch the Yali people jump and dance and sing and celebrate over something we take so for granted was both powerful and moving. It quite literally moved me to tears. How I wish we, in the Western world, could experience that excitement and joy.

There is some bonus material included on the DVD. This includes “Lessons from the Yali Story” (a discussion of missions, a music video, two shortened versions of the main documentary, some commentary and John Wilson’s story of surviving cancer.

The Yali Story is a fascinating story and one that has served to encourage many Christians. I highly recommend this DVD for church, public or private libraries. http://www.challies.com/music-movies/dvd-review-the-yali-story

Customer Reviews

- Very Good

Good documentary on the transformation of a tribe in Southeast Asia. Very encouraging and informative.

- Challenging

This movie reminded me that God is not willing that any should perish but that all should come to repentance. And that if just one person who doesn't know him, sees him in nature and calls on Him, or wonders who the creator is, he will send someone to tell them about him. This story is remarkable in that these people were unlearned cannibals, but when exposed to outsiders and God's love, they became translators and teachers of God's word. It left me awestruck at the fact that God's word is truly alive and if it can change an unexposed cannibal, why don't we trust it to change our neighbors and friends.

- Excellent Teaching Tool

The discussion part at the end is worth the price of the video. We use it to help train cross-cultural workers at our school, as it brings out a lot of good principles for cross-cultural ministry.

- la historia de los Yaly

excelente material, lo vi por canal Enlace

www.visionvideo.com
PO Box 540, Worcester PA, 19490 | 1(800)523-0226 | support@visionvideo.com
Customer Service Hours: 8:00 am - 6:00 pm EST